Frontline Cats Products Treating Fleas And Parasites That Attack Your Pets

Fleas are common parasites that can cause distress to both pets and pet owners.Frontline for cats products can be a proactive way for you to treat those harmful parasites that attack your pets.

Why You Need to Prevent Fleas

Fleas are blood sucking parasites that can cause misery to their hosts. Flea bites can be very irritating and cause swelling, itching and sore skin. Both humans and animals can also be allergic to the fleas saliva. This can make flea bites even more unpleasant and can make you feel generally unwell. Fleas can also sometimes pass bacteria and diseases through their bites.

Fleas are common parasites and they can quickly spread so it is important to be proactive about treating and preventing them. Regular usage of Frontline for cats products can help you to stay on top of fleas and prevent them from making you and your pets lives a misery.

How Do Frontline Cats Products Work?

Frontline cats products work in a very unique way. Instead of repelling fleas they actively work to kill them. This means that any adult fleas picked up by your cats will be killed quickly before they can irritate you pets or start laying eggs around your home.

Frontline cats products contain a chemical that works to over-stimulate the fleas nervous system. This is fatal to the flea but does not harm your pets in anyway.

Once you have treated your pets the Frontline for cats products will get to work treating existing fleas. They should be killed within 24 hours and will drop off naturally.

You will need to use the Frontline Spot On products regularly to maintain protection against fleas (every four weeks).

This can be combined with Insect Growth Regulator (IGR) products that can treat eggs and larvae already present in your home.

This can help to break the flea life cycle and prevent infestations from taking over your home.

The Spot On products will need to be applied on the skin at the back of the neck on your cats. This will ensure your cat cannot lick the product off before it gets to work

Dont forget fleas can be a problem all year round due to modern centrally heated homes. This means you should continue to use Frontline for cats products in the winter to maintain protection.

Frontline cats products can also treat other parasites such as ticks.

Ticks are also very common particularly in more rural areas that have higher wild animal populations.

Ticks are recognised as a key carrier of diseases such as Lyme disease which can be unpleasant for humans and difficult to treat.

Ticks will feed from both animal and human hosts so it is important to prevent against these blood-sucking parasites.

With Frontline cats products you can treat your pets for both fleas and ticks and help to keep these nasty parasites at bay.

Using Animals To Control Duckweed

Duckweed can be a major problem if it is allowed to grow without any restrictions on a small, still pond or lake. Moving water can help to deter the growth of duckweed but in some ponds it is not possible to have moving water. In these cases one option to control duckweed is to use animals that will eat duckweed as a food source. There are many different animals that regularly eat duckweed and that can be introduced to your pond to help contain its growth. Ducks, (obviously), fish, geese, turtles, and other animals are all known to eat duckweed. Having some of these animals living in or around your pond can have a noticeable difference in the surface coverage of duckweed and pond health.

So what animals eat duckweed?

Many tropical and freshwater fish are known to eat duckweed when it is found in their environment. In fact the duck-weed plant is a favorite food source for tilapia and carp fish farmers. Tilapia in particular are a great fish for controlling duckweed growth due to their own fast growth rate, and their voracious appetite for duckweed and other aquatic plants. At the end of the year you can even harvest your Tilapia before your pond freezes for a great fish meal. Before introducing fish to any pond or body of water make sure you check your local rules and regulations, as it is illegal to introduce non-native fish in some areas.

Waterfowl such as ducks and geese can also eat enough duckweed to help to control it, but these animals alone are generally not enough to keep duckweed in check, and often additional methods and/or other animals are needed to keep a pond healthy.

There are also many mammals that make duckweed a major part of their diet. Some North American examples are muskrats, beaver, woodchucks, and other small rodents. Reptiles and amphibians also occasionally eat duckweed. Snakes, turtles, and frogs are all known to eat the duckweed plant. However like waterfowl, these animals are generally not enough to control duckweed by themselves, but when combined with other methods and animals they can be part of a comprehensive pond duckweed control plan.

So if duckweed is taking over your pond, making an ugly, smelly eyesore, consider some natural weed control methods before resorting to more expensive, and potentially harmful chemical treatments.

Please visit the author’s site for more information on how to control duckweed, as well as more in depth information about what animals eat duckweed and other methods for removing duckweed from your pond or lake.

Very Few Bird Feeder Plans Found Online For Window Feeders

Window bird feeders are no more than an extension of your present window sill or opening. According to these plans all that is necessary is to attach a horizontal member the width of your window and just underneath your sill or opening. The distance just under your window sill should be the very same as the thickness of the tray itself. This will allow the tray piece to set on top of the horizontal piece and be level with the sill or opening. Cut your tray to extend outward ten or twelve inches and run the width of the window. Place, then affix the L-brackets underneath the tray with the longer leg of the L-bracket underneath the tray. Affix the shorter leg of the L-shape to the horizontal board you attached to the outside of the residence just beneath the window . The two L-brackets should be spaced to allow for the greatest support. If your feeder tray is wider than an average window and is very long, you need to have more brackets to support the weight evenly.

For flexibility, you may want to make a three sided cover the very same size as the depth of the tray to shelter the birds and the food. Some birds favor the protection, but other species don’t seem to mind the exposure. The shelter is convenient in the winter though, when snow is likely to cover the birds’ feed. On top of that, the shelter keeps the water out in the spring and summer months which helps keep the food fresh. Remember not to attach your little cover to the tray so you can readily remove it when the tray needs cleaning.

As to the top rated wood to use, redwood cedar is best for durability, but most any wood will do except pressure treated wood. Pressure treated wood has chemicals that can harm the birds. You shouldn’t paint your tray either as the birds may pick up paint flecks as they eat which can also poison them.

What variety bird food you set out is entirely up to you as different types of foods will entice different species of birds. Foods typically present in your house will suffice or you can obtain commercially processed bird feed. Birds’ eating habits range from suet (hard beef fat, especially needed in the winter) to bread crumbs, raisins, fruits, bacon bits, and peanut butter. Surely, all of these things can be found right in your own kitchen and won’t cost anything more.

In closing, remember that some birds will be afraid to come to your window area to eat because they feel exposed out in the open and next to the window itself. You can change that easily enough by choosing a window near foliage or trees. If that is not possible, place some vegetation both inside the window and outside on the feed tray to make the birds feel safe.

How Do Pheromones Affect The Behavior Of Pets

For first time users of pheromones, the question How do pheromones affect the behavior of my pet is very common. Naturally, we all worry about the effects that certain substances will have on the behavior of our pets so it is perfectly all right to ask many questions about the effects of such substances.

Generally, pheromones have positive effects on your pets. If your pet is anxious or does not have any inclinations to breed, pheromones can help your pet a lot. In fact, according to some experts, when it comes to pets that are highly excitable, the use of pheromones is essential to help the pet cope with daily living. The question now is How do pheromones affect the behavior of pets when it is used on a long term basis. Is it really safe to use this substance for a prolonged period of time?

A lot people often worry about the behavior of their dogs. Every once in a while, dogs can become anxious or overly excited about something that they end up behaving badly whether they are in the house or outside. More often than not, vets would advise dog owners to use pheromones to help their dog calm down. However, the question now is how do pheromones affect behavior when used on a long term basis? Note that according to studies, the effect of the pheromones is on a short term basis and if you are using one of those pheromone sprays to help your dog calm down, you may need to spray often for lasting effects.

Getting Answers

Although there are no significant reports about the side effects of the use of pheromones to help pets calm down, many pet owners are wondering as to how pheromones affect behavior in the long run. Will the dog or the cat become dependent on the pheromones? If you eventually stop using the pheromone spray, will your dog or your cat suffer some withdrawal syndrome such as anxiety?

At this point, there are not really enough studies conducted on the effects of long term use of pheromones on pets. If you are worried about side effects of long term use of pheromones on your pet, it would be a good idea to ask the question on how do pheromones affect the behavior of your dog or cat during your next visit to the vet because he or she can tailor an answer specific to your pet.